post your thesis for the R and J essay here!!!!   or else!!!
 


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Chillin Dylan
05/02/2012 08:15

In the play, Romeo and Juliet, by Shakespeare Romeo expresses that his love is truer for Juliet than for Rosaline by describing each woman, himself, and love.

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Derek S.
05/02/2012 12:23

In William Shakespeare's tragical masterpiece <em>Romeo and Juliet</em>, it is often alluded in the characters' language during the Chorus' poems, in Romeo's dream, and in Friar Lawrence's foreboding that fate, not there actions, is the one that controls their future.

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Josh K
05/02/2012 13:31

Lord Capulet's mood swings concerning Juliet's marriage emphasizes his character and brings out a theme of the play.

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Virginia Foggo
05/02/2012 13:42

Shakespeare usesFriar Lawrence's soliloquy in the beginning of Act 2 Scene 3 to not only foreshadows future events in the play, but also to portray the dual nature of human intentions.

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Elijah House
05/02/2012 14:24

In Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare's language conveys a theme: love is a concept of nature that can't be compared with man-made objects.

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Justin Chang
05/02/2012 15:05

With Romeo and Juliet being so young, it is difficult to see their romance becoming anything substantial, but as the play progresses, what seems like a regular courtship evolves into a love so passionate that they could not live without each other.

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Alyssa
05/02/2012 15:20

Frair Lawrence's soliloquy foretells the future of the star-crossed lovers.

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Jamie T.
05/02/2012 15:22

Through Romeo's language it is clear that his love for Juliet is much truer than his love for Rosaline.

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Sophie E.
05/02/2012 15:24

By using various similes and metaphors stated by Juliet, Romeo and Mercutio, Shakespeare convey's the message that love is higher and more pure than the earthly qualities of humans.

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Adam
05/02/2012 15:31

Juliet's immediate reaction to the nurse telling her that Romeo has killed Tybalt shows many different themes such as infatuation, strong feelings of hate, and dealing with tragedy.

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Joshua Eng
05/02/2012 15:32

Romeo shows that his love for Juliet is not substantially different or truer than his love for Rosaline through his description of each woman and when he talks about love.

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Rochelle Y.
05/02/2012 15:33

In Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, Romeo shows through his language how his love for Juliet is very different from his love for Rosaline with metaphors, paradoxes, and his general vagueness for his love about Rosaline.

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Emily W.
05/02/2012 15:35

In Shakespeare's play, both Romeo and Juliet are impacted by Friar Lawrence's soliloquy, which foreshadows the events that will occur at the end of the play as well as explain the reasons for their being good and evil in humans and nature.

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Emily W.
05/02/2012 15:37

there*

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Kelly D.
05/02/2012 16:17

Romeo and Juliet, though both remarkably similar in certain aspects, both have very different ways of expressing their thoughts and feelings that provide the reader with insight into their personalities, their feelings towards each other and their general view towards life.

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Holly
05/02/2012 16:26

In the play, "Romeo and Juliet", Romeo, Juliet, and the Nurse use intense dialogue to prove their loev to one another.

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Lia C
05/02/2012 16:33

In Romeo and Juliet, certain aspects such as the way Romeo describes each women, himself, and the commitment of each relationship all prove his love for Juliet is truer than his love for Rosaline.

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Beth Feindt-Scott
05/02/2012 17:22

The dialogue Romeo uses when describing each woman's beauty, his love and his life without each of them proves his love is infatuation and unreal.

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Selena Hunter
05/02/2012 17:26

In the play, Romeo's language makes it clear that his love for Juliet is Substantively truer than his love for Rosaline.

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Sam Yin
05/02/2012 17:46

Romeo's "love" for Juliet is the same as his "love" for Rosaline, he talks about both of them the same way, he has tantrums when he doesn't get his wish, and Romeo supposedly "falls in love" with Juliet at first sight.

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David Y.
05/02/2012 18:26

During the play Romeo and Juliet, the Friar's soliloquy is crucial to the fate of both Romeo and Juliet and ending of the tragedy.

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Andrew L
05/02/2012 18:34

In Romeo and Juliet, figurative language is used to refer to the theme of death, and it's constant use by the characters foreshadows the tragic events of the play.

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Katie S.
05/02/2012 18:38

Romeo's love for Juliet is truer than his love for Rosaline because it is a different kind of love and Romeo is excited about it, but there are also examples of when both situations seem the same.

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Kat Mazur
05/02/2012 18:39

In Romeo and Juliet, Romeo's symbolic and ironic dreams allude to the concept of fate.

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Jimmy Donoghue
05/03/2012 03:08

Juliet's words of 2.1.74-78 in Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" are the expounders of many structural themes including rivalry, love and forshadowing,

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Caroline Lentz
05/03/2012 05:08

Based on what he says, Romeo's love for Juliet is not different from his love for Rosaline.

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Anna J
05/03/2012 06:01

In "Romeo and Juliet", Shakespeare uses the contrast of light and dark to provide vivid and powerful imagery.

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Andrew Lombard
05/03/2012 18:13

“Within the infant rind of this small flower poison hath residence and medicine power: For this, being smelt, with that part cheers each part; being tasted, stays all senses of the heart” (2.3.23-27). Death is a central reoccurring theme in Romeo and Juliet, and it is frequently brought up and referenced to many times during the play with different literary devices. In Romeo and Juliet, figurative language is used to refer to the theme of death, and it's constant use by the characters foreshadows the tragic events of the play.

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Kelly D.
05/03/2012 18:44

Shakespeare’s eloquence and selective word choice throughout the play Romeo and Juliet reflect the minds of the characters in their dialogue. Whether it is the detailed imagery or the allusions to previous works or events, every line chips away at the wall between the reader and the character. The way that each event or person is described holds more importance than its actual meaning in many situations. However, this being true, Romeo and Juliet are would be categorized as practically opposites, viewing everything in contradictory ways, whether it is something as serious as forgiveness versus revenge or juvenile as the sun versus the moon. Romeo and Juliet, though both remarkably similar in certain aspects, both have very different ways of expressing their thoughts and feelings that provide the reader with insight into their personalities, their feelings towards each other and their general view towards life.

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Josh K
05/04/2012 05:56

"But now, my lord, what says you to my suit (1.2.6)?" With these words of Count Paris, he introduces his intentions to marry Juliet to Lord Capulet and the audience. His line also begins for Lord Capulet a contemplative dance with the concept of his only daughter being married off. For any father, this experience is a difficult one, and Lord Capulet does not disappoint.Lord Capulet's changing opinion on Juliet's marriage, often exhibiting itself in an extreme form, brings out the theme of the difficulty of parenting and also develops and emphasizes the lord's complex character.

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Sophie E.
05/04/2012 06:00

At one point or another in life, most people have to stop and ask themselves, what is love? Is it just part of the basic human passions that have evolved from the animal wish to mate, or is it something greater than all of us originating in the heavens themselves? While many agree that part of love is made up of basic primal instincts, there is something irresistible in the notion that love is a force of nature, a system of divine proportions that follows us through life and tells us “who is right.” In this mode of thought, it is natural that humans have begun to compare this force to other aspects of nature to fulfill that basic want of “something larger.” Throughout the ages, many people have communicated this idea through poetry and prose, sometimes fulfilling that need and other times leaving us feeling empty inside. The English playwright, Shakespeare, was one such author who was especially gifted at subtly conveying this message through literary devices as well as the plots of his plays. Specifically, in Romeo and Juliet, he uses various similes and metaphors stated by Juliet, Romeo and Mercutio to convey the message that love is higher and more pure than the earthly qualities of man.

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Virginia Foggo
05/04/2012 06:00

Romeo and Juliet is one of the most famous plays ever written. Shakespeare uses beautiful language and literary devices to describe characters annd events in detail. He also cleverly foreshadows future occurences while pointing out important themes at the same time. One major theme in the book is that even the best of intentions can go bad, and things don't always go as planned. Shakespeare uses Friar Lawrence's soliloquy in the beginning of Act 2 Scence 3 to not only foreshadow Romeo and Juliet's fate, but also to portray the dual nature of human intentions.

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Chillin Dylan
05/04/2012 06:02

Most of society says that Romeo and Juliet by Shakespeare is the greatest love story ever. However, in the first act of the play, Romeo is in love with a woman called Rosaline. So how does he all of a sudden fall in love with Juliet, and is he really in love with her? The way Romeo suddenly changes his mind about who he loves is infatuation, so is his love with Juliet romantic, or infatuation? In the play, Romeo and Juliet, by Shakespeare Romeo expresses that his love is truer for Juliet than for Rosaline by describing each woman, himself, and love.

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Joshua Eng
05/04/2012 06:02

In the famous tragedy "Romeo and Juliet," Romeo has two lovers throughout the course of the story. He first has a strong infatuation for Rosaline, but she takes a vow of chastity and will never be with Romeo. Due to this unrequited love, Romeo becomes depressed and excessively weeps about his predicament, wallowing in self-pity. Quickly afterwards, however, Romeo falls in love with Juliet and starts a romantic relationship with her. The love affair of Romeo and Juliet has become world-famous in literature, but is Romeo's love for Juliet substantially different or any truer than his love is for Rosaline? If a reader analyzes Romeo's words carefully when he describes each woman, it can be revealed that his love for Juliet is similar to his pseudo-love for Rosaline is similar to his love for Juliet. Based on Romeo's description of each woman in "Romeo and Juliet" by William Shakespeare, Romeo's love for Juliet is neither substantially different nor truer than his love for Rosaline.

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Caroline Lentz
05/04/2012 06:03

"He that is strucken blind cannot forget the precious treasure of his eyesight lost. Show me a mistress that is passing fair; with doth her beauty serve but as a note where I may read who passed that passing fair" (1.1.241-245) Romeo told Benvolio he could never love anyone but Rosaline. He said that her beauty surpassed all others, comparing life without her to living dead, saying "She hath forsworn to love, and in that vow do I live dead, that live to tell it now." (1.1.231-232). When he met Juliet, he forgot Rosaline and directed his words toward his new love, now claiming she surpasses all others. Based on what he says, Romeo's love for Juliet is not different from his love for Rosaline.

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Rochelle Y.
05/04/2012 06:04

Throughout the ages, it has not been uncommon for young men to have multiple love interests. Romeo, from the ever famous tragedy Romeo and Juliet, is certainly no exception to this somewhat peculiar but undeniably true statement. For quite some time now, Romeo has had his eye trained on the ever beautiful Rosaline. However, she has taken a vow of chastity, and he has found himself in the extremely painful position of a Petrarchan lover, forever bemoaning his unrequited love. In the hopes of returning Romeo to his senses, Benvolio begs his cousin to forget Rosaline. Romeo though, only says, “Show me a mistress that is passing fair, what doth her beauty serve, but as a note, where I may read who pass'd that passing fair?” (1.1 243-245). Though he praises her endlessly with colorful language and intricate comparisons, Romeo once again falls head over heels when he lays eyes on Juliet. He says almost the same things that he does to Rosaline, calling Juliet’s eyes, “two of the fairest stars in all the heaven,”(2.2 15). To the casual reader or observer of the play, it seems as though Romeo is as full of lovely comparisons as a book is full of words, and he tosses those comparisons to every girl that passes by his line of sight. However, in closer observance, it can be seen that his attitude shifts from one girl to the other. His love for Rosaline is a mere frivolity, while his love for Juliet is actually strong and true. How is this conveyed? Through the exact method that seems to be his short point-language. In Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, Romeo shows through his language how his love for Juliet is very different from his love for Rosaline with metaphors, paradoxes, and his general vagueness about his ‘love’ for Rosaline.

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A BETH ORIGINAL
05/04/2012 06:08


With Romeo and Juliet being so young, it is difficult to see their romance becoming anything substantial, but as the play progresses, what seems like a regular courtship evolves into a love so passionate that they could not live without each other.

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KAT MAZUR ORGINAL PARAGRAPH. NOT ANDREW LOMBARDS.
05/04/2012 06:09


“Within the infant rind of this small flower poison hath residence and medicine power: For this, being smelt, with that part cheers each part; being tasted, stays all senses of the heart” (2.3.23-27). Death is a central reoccurring theme in Romeo and Juliet, and it is frequently brought up and referenced to many times during the play with different literary devices. In Romeo and Juliet, figurative language is used to refer to the theme of death, and it's constant use by the characters foreshadows the tragic events of the play.

Reply
ANOTHER BETH ORIGINAL PARAGRAPH. NOT STOLEN. I MEAN IT.
05/04/2012 06:10


Throughout the ages, it has not been uncommon for young men to have multiple love interests. Romeo, from the ever famous tragedy Romeo and Juliet, is certainly no exception to this somewhat peculiar but undeniably true statement. For quite some time now, Romeo has had his eye trained on the ever beautiful Rosaline. However, she has taken a vow of chastity, and he has found himself in the extremely painful position of a Petrarchan lover, forever bemoaning his unrequited love. In the hopes of returning Romeo to his senses, Benvolio begs his cousin to forget Rosaline. Romeo though, only says, “Show me a mistress that is passing fair, what doth her beauty serve, but as a note, where I may read who pass'd that passing fair?” (1.1 243-245). Though he praises her endlessly with colorful language and intricate comparisons, Romeo once again falls head over heels when he lays eyes on Juliet. He says almost the same things that he does to Rosaline, calling Juliet’s eyes, “two of the fairest stars in all the heaven,”(2.2 15). To the casual reader or observer of the play, it seems as though Romeo is as full of lovely comparisons as a book is full of words, and he tosses those comparisons to every girl that passes by his line of sight. However, in closer observance, it can be seen that his attitude shifts from one girl to the other. His love for Rosaline is a mere frivolity, while his love for Juliet is actually strong and true. How is this conveyed? Through the exact method that seems to be his short point-language. In Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, Romeo shows through his language how his love for Juliet is very different from his love for Rosaline with metaphors, paradoxes, and his general vagueness about his ‘love’ for Rosaline.

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Alyssa
05/04/2012 06:11

From the lingering dreams and the ambiguity of conversation, the story of Romeo and Juliet is haunted by foreshadowing. Dreams and soliloquies in stories are always more perplexing than just words. They're prophacies, and they always end up being right in the end. Romeo can attest to that, predicting more than just death, through out his dreams.

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jamie t.
05/04/2012 06:17

You would never think that you could be so in love with one person and in a matter of hours completely fall for another. In the beginning of the play "Romeo and JUliet", Romeo obsesses over Rosaline, who doesn;t love him back. Until he meets Juliet he swears he "ne'er saw true beauty" (1.5.52). So how do we know these are his true feelings and he is not just infatuated by Juliet? The way romeo uses his language to describe Rosaline, Juliet and himself all clearly show that his love for Juliet is truer than his love for Rosaline.

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Sam Yin
05/04/2012 06:17

Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare's most famous tragedy, has one of the main characters, Romeo, is in a complicated love relationship. He apparently loves Rosaline for a least a couple weeks, then when he is rejected, falls in love again within a couple of hours, with Rosaline's cousin of all people. During the book he gives the same descriptions of Rosaline and Juliet when he first meets them, calling them both the most beautiful things that he has ever seen. Readers believe that Romeo and Juliet is the ultimate love story only because they died for each other. But how do we know that Romeo would not have done the same thing for Rosaline if he was not rejected? Based on Romeo's actions and words, we can say that Romeo was not truly in love with Juliet.

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Kelly D.
05/04/2012 06:19

Shakespeare’s eloquence and selective word choice throughout the play Romeo and Juliet reflect the minds of the characters in their dialogue. Whether it is the detailed imagery or the allusions to previous works or events, every line chips away at the wall between the reader and the character. In many instances, the words and phrases that Romeo and Juliet use in their speech carry more significance than what they are actually saying. The straight forward meaning is only a small fraction of what the reader can take from their words because their phrasing tells so much about them. This being true, Romeo and Juliet are would be categorized as practically opposites, viewing everything in contradictory ways, whether it is something as serious as forgiveness versus revenge or juvenile as the sun versus the moon. Romeo and Juliet, though both remarkably similar in certain aspects, both have very different ways of expressing their thoughts and feelings that provide the reader with insight into their personalities, their feelings towards each other and their general view towards life.

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Elijah House
05/04/2012 06:22

Shakespeare’s use of figurative language makes Romeo and Juliet one of the most well-known stories in the world. If someone would look “in between” the lines, they would find many more hidden messages and secrets in Shakespeare’s language. These messages are hidden throughout the story and are often subtle. Such messages and secrets can hint to a theme about life or nature. One such that Shakespeare’s language conveys is that love is a concept of nature that can't be compared with man-made objects.

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D. Rock
05/04/2012 06:23

Since ancient times, people have often pondered who controls their actions. Do we truly decide our own actions, or are our futures predetermined by a higher power known as fate? We do not know the answer, nor is it probable that we ever will know. However, this question has long been debated by many great thinkers and authors. In William Shakespeare's tragic masterpiece Romeo and Juliet, it is often alluded in the characters' language and dialogue during the Chorus' poems, in Romeo's dream, and in Friar Lawrence's foreboding that fate, not their actions, is the one that controls their future.

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David Y.
05/04/2012 06:24

There are many compliments from Romeo to both Rosaline and Juliet. Sometimes it can be said that even too many things are said by Romeo to praise their beauty. Even though Romeo compliments both of them so many times, there is a difference in his love for each other of them that is obvious through his words. One thing is that all he talks about Rosaline is her beauty and her chastity. In his words about Juliet however, there are many times where Romeo speaks about his love for her and his commitment to her even as he compliments Juliet on her beauty.

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Anna J
05/04/2012 06:28


In “Romeo and Juliet”, Shakespeare shows us the reality of love with his use of images contrasting light and dark. He uses the wonder of light to show love for Juliet, the darkness that is from conflict between Montagues and Capulets, and that darkness that makes light shine brighter in the ending. We are hit with emotion that can only be provided with such a contrast. The imagery of the greatness of morning and the fear of the night is powerful and stunning throughout the play, and it teaches us about about reality and the trueness of love.

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Taylor D
05/06/2012 08:16

In Romeo and Juliet, Juliet's monologue portrays the way Shakespeare's shows the two themes of the play; love and hate, through the character Juliet.

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Selena HUnter
05/07/2012 06:06

"i have forgot that name and that name's woe" (2.3, 49). Romeo had fallen in love with a women named Rosaline in the first act of the play Romeo and Juliet. But when he caught the eye of a young juliet he had forgotten about Rosaline. Although Romeo had just met Juliet you can tell through his words that his love for Juliet is far greater than that of Rosaline's. Romeo describes each woman's beauty in a way that shows Julkiet's beauty as great. He proclaims his love for Juliet as being more substantual than that of Rosaline. Romeo then talks about the way each women loves him back and it's that Juliet loves him more than Rosaline. In the play Romeo and Juliet, Romeo's language showws his love for Juliet is truer than his love Rosaline when he describes thier beauty, his love for each one, and the way each women loveshim back.

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